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Hard blow to my chest, right above the left breast - should I get it checked out?

I was playing football four nights ago and got hit hard in my chest, right around the heart area. Immediately, I felt super nauseous, but it went away after a couple of minutes. I noticed minor soreness, but not until today did it get really bad. Now, my chest has deep sharp pains that get worse when I move, breathe deeply, or apply pressure on the spot. The pain has spread to my back and has caused stiffness in my shoulder movement. Its not unbearable pain, but just sharp and annoying all the time. I was wondering what it could be and if I should get it checked out?
Thank you very much for your question. Pain after a trauma is not uncommon but can have many different potential causes. I suggest that you speak with your doctor to better describe your pain, quality (dull vs. sharp), severity, duration, alleviating or aggravating factors, and associated symptoms. The exact mechanism in which you got hit can also provide clues about potential causes on the pain you are experiencing. The area you are describing has skin, muscle, ribs, heart, and lungs in the area. Often times after a direct trauma, you may develop bruising or bleeding. If bleeding occurs in the skin or muscle, it can lead to a hematoma (collection of blood) that can be painful. You may also have sustained general bruising to your intercostal muscles (the muscles between your ribs that can assist with breathing). Another possibility is that you may have fractured a rib. This can manifest as pain on palpation, with breathing, or with movement. This can also alter the way in which you breath which can affect your back and shoulders as well. It is not possible to receive a diagnosis without being evaluated by a physician. I suggest that you make an appointment with your doctor or local health center.
This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.
If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or (in the United States) 911 immediately. Always seek the advice of your doctor before starting or changing treatment. Medical professionals who provide responses to health-related questions are intended third party beneficiaries with certain rights under Zocdoc’s Terms of Service.

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