ZocdocAnswersIs there any connection between CA-MRSA and kidney infection?

Question

Is there any connection between CA-MRSA and kidney infection?

I had an abscess, it was cultured and I was diagnosed with CA-MRSA. This was two months ago. I was put on antibiotics, it was lanced, drained, packed and healed. I now have a kidney infection-any connection? Also I was never given any long term instructions for dealing with this CA-MRSA. Do I have it forever, and what, if any precautions do I need to take?

Answer

Given that you have had both a recent abscess and a kidney infection, it is important that you follow-up closely with your primary care doctor to ensure that both of these issues are healing and resolving as expected, and do not require further treatment. MRSA stands for methicillin-resistant staph aureus. Staph aureus is a bacteria that commonly colonizes, or lives on skin, in the mouth and/or in the nose. Due to the increasing use of antibiotics across the country, many strains of staph aureus are now resistant to methicillin, a type of antibiotic, which use to treat all cases of staph aureus. MRSA frequently colonizes people who are health care workers, have been in or around hospitals or health care workers, or have been exposed to MRSA along the way. Therefore, you have the potential to have MRSA colonized on your skin or in your airway, which is not something to worry about. This does not indicate infection forever. The precaution to take would be to make your healthcare providers aware of this should you develop another abscess or another infection. While it is possible that your kidney infection was caused by the same type of bacteria, it is unlikely that it was related by your abscess. The way it would be possible would be if there was staph aureus in the blood, known as bacteremia, which causes severe illness. More likely, there is a separate bacteria causing the kidney infection. At times, this bacteria can be grown from the urine and treated appropriately. Kidney infections can be quite serious and require intravenous antibiotics. Therefore it is important you are under the close care of a doctor.

This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.

If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or (in the United States) 911 immediately. Always seek the advice of your doctor before starting or changing treatment. Medical professionals who provide responses to health-related questions are intended third party beneficiaries with certain rights under Zocdoc’s Terms of Service.