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Burning pain in the lower left abdomen - what should I do?

I've had constant burning pain in the lower left abdomen (on both the front and back sides). Every once, and a while there will be an occasional dull sting three or so inches below my breast. I've changed my eating habits I've become somewhat of a vegetarian I suppose you could say. I won't eat red meat, or processed meat. Or cow milk; however, I'll still eat chicken and fish. The pain can be soothed by drinking a bottle of water, or two. While I really only notice it when I'm sitting down. If I'm standing up I don't notice it. Although it's worse at night, I've noticed that it's a lot better with my pajama pants which also happen to be my pants with easiest fitting waistband.
Thank you very much for your question, and I am sorry that you are experiencing pain. Abdominal pain is a very common complaint. Depending on your age, past medical history, family history, and environmental factors, there are many different potential causes for abdominal pain. I recommend that you make an appointment with your primary care doctor or local health center for a diagnosis. You mention that you have pain in your lower left abdomen though you describe it to be about 3 inches below your breast. For left upper abdominal pain, one potential cause would be a peptic ulcer. Peptic ulcers are breakdowns in the mucosal lining of your stomach or duodenum (first portion of your small bowel) that can cause abdominal pain. Common causes of ulcer include use of NSAIDs (such as ibuprofen, naproxen, aspirin), smoking, alcohol, and a bacterium known as H pylori. You may also have diverticulitis, an inflammation of small outpouchings in your colon that can cause mild to severe pain depending on the severity of the inflammation. You may also be experiencing general symptoms of reflux, though this would be more associated with burning sensation in your chest. It is not possible to receive a diagnosis without first being evaluated by a doctor or other qualified health professional. Again, I suggest that you make an appointment with your primary care doctor or local health center for a diagnosis.
This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.
If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or (in the United States) 911 immediately. Always seek the advice of your doctor before starting or changing treatment. Medical professionals who provide responses to health-related questions are intended third party beneficiaries with certain rights under Zocdoc’s Terms of Service.

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