ZocdocAnswersDo I have staph and what should I do about it?

Question

Do I have staph and what should I do about it?

I have had recurring boil things on my inner thigh right by my scrotum. Usually the drain themselves and go away. This recent one is scary though. Started about 4-5 days ago as a red bump that got really big. On the 3rd day I woke up to find it is much smaller and drained a bit of blood. Now it's the 5th or 6th night and its still really painful and open bloody looking thing but doesn't bleed much and still hurts a lot unless its covered by a band aid. There's also some white weak looking skin around the sore area that started this morning.

Answer

It sounds like you are suffering from a small abscess under the thigh. I recommend that you schedule an appointment with your primary care physician. An abscess is a collection of bacteria and white blood cells that are involved in a battle just underneath your skin. An abscess is the way that your body walls off an infection and helps prevent it from spreading to other parts of the body. One of the most common types of bacteria that can result in abscesses is staphylococcus or staph for short. Another type that is common is streptococcus or strep. In your case, I suspect staph. This bacteria lives on the skin and enters through small breaks in the skin. Sometimes the breaks can be small enough that you might not notice it. Besides antibiotics and drainage of the abscess on occasion, you can help prevent this infection by cleaning this area thoroughly. Again, I suggest that you schedule an appointment with your primary care physician. Your doctor can examine the area and see if this new abscess needs lanced to allow the infection to exit. In addition, the two of you can discuss what cleaning methods you should try to help prevent this kind of thing from happening in the future. Finally, I would suggest that you returned to your doctor any time you see one of these things developing earlier than later so that they can be treated before they get too large.

This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.

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