ZocdocAnswersAre low blood pressure and tiredness related? What to do?

Question

Are low blood pressure and tiredness related? What to do?

I'm a 25 year old male. I'm not the kind who goes to the doctors very often but the past 2 occasions in the past 3-4 years I've been told that I have low blood pressure, although neither occasions have the doctors pressured me to do anything about it. I know that this is something that can be common in taller people (I'm 6' 5", 13.5 Stone) and athletes (which I am not, although I would say I'm not unfit). For a while now I find that I am constantly tired, yawning all the time, feeling like I need to stretch, taking naps unintentionally almost every day and feeling pretty sluggish in the evenings. Could the tiredness be caused by my low blood pressure? and if so what can I do to fix the problem? I feel like I'm wasting my 20's being knackered all the time.

Answer

That is an excellent question and one that is best answered by your primary care doctor or other medical professional. There are several causes for the symptoms you have described but since there is not enough information to make a hypothesis for what is the cause of these symptoms in you, it is best that you are evaluated by your primary care doctor who will be able to evaluate you and obtain a history and physical examination. It is not clear how low your blood pressure was from the information provided, but it is not uncommon that you may have low blood pressure if you are young and are physically fit. The tiredness may be normal as well. On the other hand, there could be an underlying cause of this tiredness and low blood pressure such as low blood counts (anemia), dehydration, medication usage, or thyroid dysfunction. Any of these issues can cause the symptoms you are describing and so it is advisable that you are seen by a primary care doctor who can work with you to find out what is the cause of the symptoms you have and then decide upon the appropriate treatment which might include medications or supplements.

This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.

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