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Could my fast heart rate caused IRBBB to show up on my ECG?

Hi i recently was diagnosed with incomplete right bundle branch block, im a female aged 24. Im a bit worried that anything could have caused this? How rare it it? And i maybe think it showed up on the ECG because i was panicking and my heart rate was 100beats per minute, could my heart rate maybe have caused this to show up? And do i have a higher chance if getting full rbbb? Thanks so much. Charlotte
With any sort of abnormal EKG finding, including an incomplete right bundle branch block (IRBBB), it is important to place this in the appropriate overall clinical context. I strongly encourage you to discuss this with a cardiologist, who can help determine if any additional testing is necessary. Your heart has it's own electrical system. An electrical impulse starts in your right atrium, one of the top chambers of your heart, and travels to the other chambers, causing a normal heart beat. The electrical system of the ventricles, or bottom chambers of your heart, is divided into a right and left bundle. When there is an abnormality of one of these bundles, that chamber of the heart is activates through a slower system, which leads to a bundle branch block. A right bundle branch block itself is typically not a problem, but it may indicate a more serious underlying problem. Such conditions include pulmonary hypertension, pulmonary embolism, or congenital heart disease. An incomplete right bundle branch block means that the signal to your right ventricle is somewhat slowed but not completely interrupted. A fast heart beat cannot cause an incomplete bundle branch block; it can only cause a complete bundle branch block. I strongly encourage you to consult a cardiologist, who can help determine whether any additional testing, such as an echocardiogram, is necessary to determine the cause of this EKG finding.
This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.
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