ZocdocAnswersI had an ECG and thickness of mitral valve and mitral valve regurgitation was detected. Should I be worried about?

Question

I had an ECG and thickness of mitral valve and mitral valve regurgitation was detected. Should I be worried about?

I had an abnormal ECG so my dr suggested I get an echocardiogram. The results of that were thickness in the mitral valve and regurgitation in the mitral valve. Also posterior wall thickness was noted. I'm a 21 year old female, should I be worried?

Answer

Thank you for this interesting question. It is difficult to comment on an EKG or echocardiogram without being able to see the studies myself. I think it is reasonable for you to schedule an appointment with a cardiologist, who can help review these studies with you and make recommendations on whether anything needs to be followed over time. Thickness of the mitral valve means that the thin piece of tissue separating your left atrium and left ventricle (chambers of your heart) is slightly thicker than average. This is typically a benign finding. However, depending on the location of the extra tissue, it is possible you have mitral valve prolapse, which can make the valve close abnormally. If the valve closes abnormally, this can allow blood to reflux backward, which is called mitral regurgitation. I cannot tell from your question the severity of your mitral regurgitation. A small amount is common and may never cause an issue. More severe mitral regurgitation can eventually cause your heart to not pump well, which would require surgery to repair. I also cannot tell whether the posterior wall thickness is normal or not without being able to see the images. A markedly thick posterior wall could indicate a rare, genetic cardiomyopathy that may cause problems in the future. I recommend you arrange an appointment with a cardiologist to discuss these possibilities.

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