ZocdocAnswersA few weeks ago I injured my skin between my thumb and my index finger. Should I see my doctor about this?

Question

A few weeks ago I injured my skin between my thumb and my index finger. Should I see my doctor about this?

A few weeks ago I injured my skin between my thumb and my index finger. Since then, the injury (which itself is very small) has turned very dark red, and the skin around it seems to stay rather dry. It doesn't feel inflamed. Do you think I should see my doctor about it?

Answer

In general, if you feel something is not right or you are concerned it is always a good idea to see your doctor. They can usually fit you in for a quick appointment and it will ease your mind. It's a little hard to tell from your description what's going on. The natural pattern for a skin injury that's healing is for the skin to close up and form scar tissue. This is often thinner and shinier, and usually paler or redder. Sometimes as skin heals it can form a thicker band of fibrous tissue that is firm and potentially raised. It could be that the redness you are describing is simply the thinner scar tissue I mentioned, and the dryness could be from the healing process itself which can lead to dryness and itching. Vaseline or A&D ointment can sometimes help with those symptoms and help with healing overall. That being said, an infection would also potentially appear red; you would also look for more pain/tenderness, and possibly pus drainage from the site. If the lesion isn't healing and it's been several weeks, it is definitely a good idea to have a healthcare professional take a look and make sure that there is no infection or another reason such as cancer that would cause the lesion not to heal.

This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.

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