ZocdocAnswersIs it normal to notice a large mass that stretches from the pelvis to the stomach. What could it be?

Question

Is it normal to notice a large mass that stretches from the pelvis to the stomach. What could it be?

Could there be a reason besides cancer why an elderly female with rheumatoid arthritis would have a large mass that stretches from her pelvis to her stomach?

Answer

The answer to your question depends on where exactly the mass is and what it's composed of. I strongly recommend that you see your primary care doctor. In general, it would be unusual for cancer to present as a mass on the superficial part of your stomach. It is possible, since certain kinds of benign growths or cancers would present this way; these include lipomas and liposarcomas, and conceivably certain skin cancers. You could also have a mass inside your abdomen caused by any number of cancers, including colon cancer, liver cancer, and uterine or ovarian cancer that you are feeling; this would usually not be a discrete mass that you could easily feel the edges of but rather a bulging belly or feeling of fullness. Other things that can cause a large mass that are not cancer include a hernia (which would be a bulging that you notice particularly when you sit up or use your stomach muscles) or a hematoma (a large bruise) that is in the muscle of your abdomen. You could also have an infection or abscess, or a benign intra-abdominal growth. Because the list of possibilities is so long, I strongly recommend you see your primary care doctor. They can examine this mass and help determine whether it is likely to be benign or whether further imaging is necessary. It can be scary to have this kind of thing checked out but it is important and you will likely feel better once you do.

This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.

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