ZocdocAnswersI get head aches multiple time times a week. What could be wrong?

Question

I get head aches multiple time times a week. What could be wrong?

I get head aches multiple time times a week I've had the same routine for over a year. I'm 16. My head aches seem to get worse when I lay down to go to sleep. My eye are more sensitive to light and hurt.

Answer

Thank you for your question regarding frequent headaches. This sounds like a horrible problem and I would encourage you to visit your doctor right away to help you manage and prevent any further episodes. Your doctor will also be able to perform a physical examination and review your medical history to rule out any other serious potential sources of your headache. That being said, it is possible you are suffering from migraines. Migraines typically cause pain on one side of the head and can be associated with symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, sensitivity to light, sounds, and smells. Migraine pain can be throbbing and quite severe. In some patients, migraines can occur right after an aura, an unusual sensation which can be visual, sensory, or motor. For example, some people report a visual illusion such as flashing or moving lights, or a sensory disturbance such as the feeling of pins and needles. Migraines are usually treated at first with pain medications such as ibuprofen but may require stronger medications such as triptans or ergotamines. There are a number of other medications that have been used as methods to prevent migraines. Botox, for example, has been FDA approved to be used in people with more than 15 migraines per month lasting over 4 hours. Please talk with your physician who can determine if this might be the cause of your symptoms or if something else is going on.

This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.

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