ZocdocAnswersI had an encounter with a call girl about 10 months ago. Could I have gotten a STD?

Question

I had an encounter with a call girl about 10 months ago. Could I have gotten a STD?

Unfortunately it ended up unprotected. I have had a cough with thick mucous since then. Yellow in the a.m. and then white and frothy throughout the day. Burning/irritation in the penis and rectum is consistent but intermittent. Have been tested for gon/chylamydia/HIV/Herpes 2 three times and negative. Have been on cipro, a z-pac and 1 month of Bactrim and no resolve. Any other STD's that should be tested for that may be treatable? Any advice for me? Thank you.

Answer

I would suggest that you scheduled appointment with your primary care physician. Generally speakingl, I must say that I do not think that your symptoms of cough with thick mucus have anything to do with an STD. This is not typically a symptom of any STD. The only exception would be oral gonorrhea, but this is typically obtained when someone engages in oral sex with another person that is infected. The symptoms of this would be a sore throat, and not really a cough with sputum. You have been tested for gonorrhea, chlamydia, HIV, and herpes simplex type II all of which have been negative. This is all very reassuring as these are the most common types of STDs. I would suggest that you additionally be tested for herpes simplex type I and syphilis along with hepatitis C. Herpes simplex type I can cause genital herpes, it is just much less common than herpes simplex type II. Hepatitis C is very rarely transmitted sexually, and syphilis, while rare, is still around in different places. These tests can all be done with blood work. Again, I would suggest that you scheduled appointment with your primary care physician to discuss this issue further. In addition, you might need a chest x-ray or a CT scan to look for a cause of your cough.

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