ZocdocAnswersI have pus pockets on my throat. Should I be worried?

Question

I have pus pockets on my throat. Should I be worried?

The other day I just had a sore throat and it hurt too swallow people just told me it was red i got home and had a fever that ran out the next morning but my throat was still hurting. I got some Nyquil but I cant even swallow that it hurts so bad nothing helps. Ibuprofen helps a little bit but barely. So lastnight I woke up throwing my guts up this red stuff I dont know what it was my mom said it wasn't blood and now im having diahrrea and chest pains and I just took a good look at my throat and I have pus pockets on them please some one help I want too goto the dr but my mom says im going to be fine

Answer

So sorry to hear about your problem. You have some different symptoms, but one of the first things that doctors think about when you mention pus pockets in the back of the throat is a common infection that is caused by a common bacteria and is known by the common name of strep throat. There are some criteria that can be used to help determine what the odds of strep throat are in any patient (these are known as the Centaur Criteria, and can be found via a quick Google search). Your doctor may or may not use these criteria when deciding whether or not to treat you with antibiotics. He or she may also consider other factors, such as your past medical history. Untreated streptococcal pharyngitis can result in some serious long term side effects, possibly including Scarlett Fever, among others. For that reason, it is good to make sure that you are seen by a doctor, as treating these infections with antibiotics does tend to decrease the number of secondary complications that can occur. Your doctor may also want to culture or otherwise test the back of your throat to see if you are infected. Again, please speak with your doctor.

This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.

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