ZocdocAnswersI had my third seizure today. What should I do now?

Question

I had my third seizure today. What should I do now?

I had my third seizure today. After the first one I got an EEG and a cat scan both which showed normal. I had been drinking heavily the night before so it was assumed alcohol was the cause. I didn't drink for a few months after that then got complacent and figured it would never happen again. Well 6 months after the original seizure it happen again after another heavy night of drinking. I got another EEG and it showed normal again. Since then, I have not had a single sip of alcohol. Today, I had another seizure. I had eaten breakfast, and got a good night sleep. I was stressed about an oncoming test I'd been studying for. An hour after the episode, my blood sugar was 92 and blood pressure was 110/70. I've already lost my drivers license after the second one. Any ideas of what it could be? And why they each happen about 6 months apart?

Answer

I am sorry to hear about your recurrent seizures. These are certainly traumatic events, and they have already had a significant impact on your life since you can no longer drive. The cause of seizures is often difficult to determine, and management of seizures is a complicated matter that must be tailored to each individual patient. In order to do this, a physician would need to review your entire medical record, perform a thorough physical exam, and review your prior studies. Therefore, I encourage you to schedule an appointment with a neurologist. Only after obtaining this information will it be possible to make recommendations on the next most appropriate steps. There are many potential causes of seizures. As you mentioned, alcohol or drug abuse can play a role. Situations like decreased sleep or stressful situations can often trigger seizures. It is important to rule out structural features, such as a brain tumor or another intracranial abnormality, that may be contributing to your seizures. There are multiple different medications used to control seizures. The type of medication used may vary based on the type of seizure you are suffering. It is also important to consider possible medication interactions when choosing seizure medications. Due to these complexities, I encourage you to schedule an appointment with a neurologist.

This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.

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