ZocdocAnswersMy father has a chronic hydrocele in left side of scrotum. What should we do?

Question

My father has a chronic hydrocele in left side of scrotum. What should we do?

my father has a chronic hydrocele in left side of scrotum. he is 83 years old person. it is a chronic hydrocele for 30 years. i think there was fibrosis in his scrotum. therefore the trans illumination test is negative. I think surgery is not suitable for his condition. because he is partially Paradise. please give me advice what am I do for this condition. thank you very much..

Answer

A scrotal hydrocele is a common condition that in and of itself is not dangerous. However, there are a few underlying causes of hydrocele development that are more concerning, and it will be important for you to schedule an appointment to have him see his doctor in order to review his particular case, perform a physical examination, run appropriate testing, and recommend a treatment course. The most common causes of scrotal hydrocele include a remnant of the lining of the abdomen that has grown into the scrotum during birth and development and which has produced the fluid contained in the hydrocele. This is a benign process, and if the hydrocele is not causing him any pain or discomfort, no intervention is required. On the other hand, concerning causes of hydrocele may include a tumor, infection, or an inguinal hernia that has traveled to the scrotum. The first two of these are unlikely in your father's case, as he has had this hydrocele for 30 years. However, it is possible that he has a hernia that may need to be repaired surgically, as it has the risk of being cut off from its blood supply and that part of the intestine can be damaged. However, if this is just a developmental abnormality and it is causing him enough discomfort that he wants it treated, the first line treatment is surgery. On the other hand, it sounds as though he would not be interested in this option, and the other intervention that can be performed is an aspiration procedure. This is a non-surgical procedure that involves draining the fluid collection (the hydrocele) in the scrotum by using a needle to draw up the liquid out of the scrotal sac. It is a very quick and relatively painless procedure, as local anesthesia is used. To explore the risks and benefits of surgery vs. aspiration, I recommend making an appointment for your father to speak with a urologist, who would be performing either of these interventions.

This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.

If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or (in the United States) 911 immediately. Always seek the advice of your doctor before starting or changing treatment. Medical professionals who provide responses to health-related questions are intended third party beneficiaries with certain rights under Zocdoc’s Terms of Service.