ZocdocAnswersI recently had a MRI done and the results say posterior bulging disc at C4-5. What does it mean?

Question

I recently had a MRI done and the results say posterior bulging disc at C4-5. What does it mean?

what does that mean and what can I do for it?

Answer

Thank you for your question regarding the results of your MRI. I would encourage you to go over your MRI results with the doctor who ordered the test for you. He or she will be able to better correlate the test results with your clinical symptoms and decide what the best course of action is for you. That being said, C4/C5 stands for cervical 4 and cervical 5 and refers to the fourth and fifth vertebrae located in your neck. The intervertebral discs are cartilaginous material located in between your vertebrae. They act as cushions to absorb shock on your spine and function to hold the vertebrae together. As we age, these discs can sometimes begin to degenerate and may even herniate, a term referring to when the middle part of the disc begins to bulge out beyond the normal outer boundaries of the disc. Trauma or straining of the area can lead to disc herniation, or simply the normal aging process. In some cases, you may not experience any symptoms of the disc herniation. Or you may experience tingling, numbness, or pain along your arm, hands, or fingers. This condition is known as sciatica and occurs because the bulging disc is touching an adjacent nerve. If you are experiencing these symptoms or severe pain, you will want to speak with your doctor about your options. There are conservative measures such as pain medication, or more invasive procedures such as steroid injections to decrease inflammation in the area, and also surgery.

This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.

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