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If I get my nose pierced will I get a keloid?

I know this may be more tattoo related, but I wanted to get advice from a professional doctor. Last year I recently found out that I had keloid skin due to a major fall which lead to a keloid forming on the left side of my waist. It was once small but I constantly kept scratching it not knowing it would grow bigger if I did so. It's about the size of a small thumb print if that makes sense. I have both of my ears pierced and I've never had a keloid form on either ear. My mother also has keloid skin (how I inherited it) and has a keloid on only on her navel due to giving birth to me having to get a c-section. She also has both of her ears pierced and even had gotten her nose pierced before and neither formed a keloid. So with all of that being said, if I get my nose pierced will i get a keloid?
I am sorry to hear that you had a major fall that led to a keloid forming on your waist, and that the fact you developed a keloid in the past has you worried that if you get your nose pierced that you may develop a keloid on your nose. I am happy to give you some general information about scar formation, and what exactly a keloid is, but ultimately I am going to recommend that you make an appointment to be evaluated by a dermatologist. They will be able to examine your skin, your scars (including the one on your waist), and take more of a history which I am unable to do in this setting. That is ultimately what you need to get the most accurate answer to your question. Often times people misuse the term keloid to describe other types of scar formation. For instance a scar that is larger than normal, and sticking out above your skin can be either a hypertrophic scar, or a keloid. the difference is that a hypertrophic scar is large, but respects the boundaries of the original injury (meaning that if there was an incision, it does not extend beyond the incision site). A keloid is a hypertrophic scar that extends beyond the margins of the wound. Both involve too much deposition of collagen, and can potentially be mitigated with topical or injectable steroids. The dermatologist will be able to tell you for certain if what you have is in fact a keloid, and if so, how best to manage further injuries (like a piercing).
This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.
If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or (in the United States) 911 immediately. Always seek the advice of your doctor before starting or changing treatment. Medical professionals who provide responses to health-related questions are intended third party beneficiaries with certain rights under Zocdoc’s Terms of Service.

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