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Can brain lesions disappear or do they just shrink in size?

I'm a middle-aged woman who contracted Lyme disease a few years ago. Now I'm being treated for several brain lesions I got as a result. The doctors said we're trying to shrink them, but will they ever disappear completely?
Brain lesions are obviously a serious concern. Discussing treatment and prognosis with an experienced neurologist (brain doctor) is a must. In general, the ability of a brain lesion to disappear or just shrink depends on the what the lesion is. Infections, tumors or benign masses can all involve the brain. For example, a tumor will likely remain without the appropriate treatment and/or surgery. A benign mass may never resolve, however these can often be removed fully by surgery. As for infections, they can often be completely cleared with the appropriate treatment. One important consideration is that some infections can form into an abscess, which is a ball of infection that cannot resolve without surgical drainage. That being said, even if a lesion remains, it may cause no further symptoms. Its unclear what exactly your brain lesion is and therefore difficult to say what will happen. While Lyme disease can often have neurological symptoms (such as causing nerve damage or even meningitis), it would be unusual for the disease itself to cause a brain lesion. It is possible that another type of brain lesion was found when brain imaging was done during your Lyme's disease course. Discussing the nature of your brain lesions, the treatment and the prognosis with your primary doctor and neurologist is important. If you are very concerned you could also discuss your case with neurosurgeon.
This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.
If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or (in the United States) 911 immediately. Always seek the advice of your doctor before starting or changing treatment. Medical professionals who provide responses to health-related questions are intended third party beneficiaries with certain rights under ZocDoc’s Terms of Service.

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