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What are the symptoms of a concussion?

A friend and I went to a hardcore show earlier, and he fell through the crowd and got kicked pretty hard on the head. He swears he feels fine, but I just want to know: what would happen if he had a concussion? What are the symptoms to watch for, and when should we take him to the hospital?
The evaluation of a concussion should involve the care of specialists including internists, emergency room physicians, neurologists, and others. Mild traumatic brain injury, or a concussion, is common but could lead to serious short-term or long-term problems. There is usually not a substantial depression in consciousness and is associated with trauma; this is assessed 30 minutes after injury. Impairment of any neurological function is short-lived. Head imaging, such as a CT scan, is indicated if the age is >60 years, nausea/vomiting, headache, intoxication, persistent anterograde amnesia, or clear trauma above the clavicle. If there is a depression of consciousness, seizure, abnormal CT, or bleeding problems, then a hospital admission is certainly warranted. A second impact while one still has a depressed consciousness, can be life-threatening. A post-concussion syndrome can ensue. There can be persistent headaches and even epilepsy can ensue as well as dizziness. If any persistent neurological symptoms or the above symptoms persist then your friend should seek immediate medical attention. It is impossible to develop a treatment or management plan without actually seeing the patient. Therefore, it is the strong recommendation is seek a referral to a neurologist to be evaluated in person.
This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.
If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or (in the United States) 911 immediately. Always seek the advice of your doctor before starting or changing treatment. Medical professionals who provide responses to health-related questions are intended third party beneficiaries with certain rights under Zocdoc’s Terms of Service.

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