ZocdocAnswersWhy causes skin growths at the base of one's penis?

Question

Why causes skin growths at the base of one's penis?

What causes skin growths at the base of one's penis? I have these, and on one hand they don't seem like a problem because they're not painful or red and they don't itch. On the other hand, I don't like the way they look and I want to get rid of them, or at least make sure that they stop appearing.

Answer

There are many possible causes of skin growths on the penis. Some of these require medical evaluation and treatment. The doctors who will be well qualified to discuss this issue with you include your internal medicine doctor or your dermatologist. A very common cause of growths on the penis are genital warts. These are fleshy, flat, at times 'cauliflower' like growths that are painless. The are caused by the human papilloma virus, which is sexually transmitted. These warts can be frozen or otherwise removed if necessary by a physician. Another common cause are skin tags. These are also fleshy, painless growth that are distinguished from warts because they are more elongated often with a narrower base and usually grow in skin folds or creases. They are caused by friction and do not require treatment unless painful. Any dark, circular growth might be a mole, which is a collection of pigmented cells under the skin. Rarely, these can turn into melanoma, a type of skin cancer. If your mole is larger than 6 mm, has multiple colors, or irregular borders these are signs that it should be checked out by a doctor. As always, the diagnosis and the management of your specific condition will require a physical examination by your personal doctor. Scheduling an office appointment with your primary care physician is highly recommended.

This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.

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