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Is a pregnant woman's body temperature warmer than average?

I'm a pregnant woman, age 22, in my first trimester. I've felt just a tiny bit feverish for the past few days, so I took my temperature. According to my thermometer, I am just a little bit warmer than normal. I definitely don't feel sick. Do pregnant women just have higher body temperatures than the average person, or should I see a doctor?
Basal body temperature (your average, non-feverish temperature) can be effected by pregnancy, but this effect usually doesn't last longer than the first trimester. It is caused by the sudden surge in progesterone that occurs just after ovulation. This rise in temperature is on average only 0.4 degrees above your normal body temperature. (example: if you are typically 98.6, then you would be 99.0). Normally, if you don't get pregnant, then your temperature will return to normal during your period. If you get pregnant, then you basal body temperature and persist higher than normal for a few more months. If you temperature raises above that 0.4 degree rise, or if you begin to feel sick, you should not assume that your temperature is all due to pregnancy. I suggest that anytime you feel that you may be coming down with something that you call you OBGYN or primary care physician right away. He or she will want to know if you are at all feeling sick and may want to see you in the office right away. When you are pregnant, you can never e too cautious. Good luck with your pregnancy.
This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.
If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or (in the United States) 911 immediately. Always seek the advice of your doctor before starting or changing treatment. Medical professionals who provide responses to health-related questions are intended third party beneficiaries with certain rights under ZocDoc’s Terms of Service.

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