Make an appointment:
Specialty
(i.e. Dermatologists)
Location

Do chlorine filters on showerheads reduce dry skin and certain rashes?

Is it true that installing chlorine filters on your showerhead can reduce dry skin and some kinds of rashes? There's a lot of stuff on the internet about the dangers of chlorine exposure, but every government website I can find describes chlorine as perfectly safe at the levels in our water supply.
Recently the chlorine content of tap water has been a subject of popular discussion, and chlorine filters for showers are becoming popular. The doctors who are best qualified to discuss this issue with you in greater detail include your primary care doctor or your dermatologist. Various government agencies have studied acceptable levels of chlorine in the water and determined their safety. Chlorine levels are tightly monitored and adjusted for this safety range by water companies. Therefore, there is no convincing evidence that the chlorine present in tap water is a major health risk. At the same time, it is likely that some people with very sensitive skin or severe eczema or other skin conditions may benefit from filtering their tap water to remove all irritating chemicals. It is likely that installing chlorine filters should not be thought of as the most important step. Most people with dry skin or skin rashes will respond just fine to simpler skin care measures. However, those who have not responded to these therapies may consider installing the filters. As always the diagnosis and the management of any particular skin complaint will require a physical examination by your personal physician. If you have any concerns, you should schedule an office visit with your dermatologist or primary care doctor.
This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.
If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or (in the United States) 911 immediately. Always seek the advice of your doctor before starting or changing treatment. Medical professionals who provide responses to health-related questions are intended third party beneficiaries with certain rights under Zocdoc’s Terms of Service.

Other Dermatologists