ZocdocAnswersCan dead nose skin clog pores and cause whiteheads?

Question

Can dead nose skin clog pores and cause whiteheads?

I'm a 26 year old woman and I've been dealing for at least 8 years with moderated acne. Usually I can keep it under control, but for the last few months I've been having really noticeable whiteheads on my nose. I try to exfoliate as much as possible, but I have the feeling my pores are getting clogged by dead skin. Is this possible? How should I treat it?

Answer

Acne is one of the most common medical problems; fortunately there are lots of great treatments. The doctors who could discuss this issue in more detail with you include your primary care doctor and your dermatologist. Both whiteheads and blackheads are types of acne. In both types, the skin pores get plugged with dead skin debris. The only difference is that with whiteheads the pore closes off allowing pus and skin oils to build up giving the spot a white appearance. The treatment of whiteheads involves removing and preventing the formation of skin debris. The first step is always good facial hygiene using a mild facial soap. It is also important to prevent excessive skin damage or plugging by avoiding many cosmetics and by using a good sun screen lotion when you are in the sun. The next step is to use a comedonolytic to remove skin debris. The most common and safest of these include benzoyl peroxide which can be found in many over the counter pharmacy products or can be obtained with a prescription in higher concentrations. As always, the diagnosis and the management of your particular skin concern will require a physical examination by your personal physician. Scheduling an office visit with your primary care doctor or your dermatologist is recommended.

This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.

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