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What is a corpus leteum cyst?

When I was getting my normal obgyn examination and pap smear last week, the doctor told me that she found a kind of cyst she called corpus luteum. What makes a cyst copus luteum? How do they get started and how can I keep this from happening again? She said it was no big deal, but I still find it frightening.
This is an example of how we as physicians need to do a better job explaining our findings to our patients. Even though a corpus luteum cyst is "no big deal," you still deserve a better explanation. A corpus luteum cyst is a normal occurrence that most women develop from time to time. Let me explain. Every month your ovaries go through a natural cycle to produce an ovulated ovum that is available for conception. Before ovulation, the ovum is surrounded by a group of cells called the granulosa cells. About midway through your cycle, your ovaries expel the ovum. Inside the ovary, the left over granulosa cells group together to form the corpus luteum. The corpus luteum's job is to produce progesterone which makes the uterine lining hospitable for pregnancy. At the end of the month, if you haven't become pregnant, the corpus luteum degenerates. Sometimes though it can fill with fluid becoming and cyst. The cyst is benign, but can produce pain for a short time before it goes away. I suggest that you bring this issue up again at your next OBGYN visit. Make sure that you ask any question that is on your mind about this issue. Good luck.
This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.
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