ZocdocAnswersWhy do I have dried blood occasionally coming out of my nose when I blow it clean?

Question

Why do I have dried blood occasionally coming out of my nose when I blow it clean?

I suffer from occasional seasonal allergies, and often feel like my sinuses are congested. However, I don't have sinus headaches. My seemingly sinus-related symptoms do occasionally lead to fevers of about 100 F. This problem has been ongoing for a number of years, and my doctor has been little help (gave me a flonase prescription). I recently added an allergy proof cover to my mattress hoping that it would help.

Answer

Sinus congestion is a very common medical problem which, unfortunately, has no quick cure. The congestion occurs when the passages that drain out the sinuses into the nose become inflamed and plugged with mucus, leading to headache, pressure, drainage, cough, and occasionally (as you write here) blood with blowing the nose clean. The best approach to treating sinusitis involved discipline and continued application of treatments even when you are feeling well. This is because it is easier to prevent a flare of sinus congestion than to treat it once it is fully developed. Flonase and other nasal steroids are one of the backbones of treating sinus congestion. They are extremely effective, however in order to work they must be taken every day for long periods of time. In addition to nasal steroid sprays, I also recommend nasal irrigation with a saline spray or, better yet, the Nettypot system. This is a little uncomfortable at first but one quickly gets used to it, and it is also very effective. Using these two methods together, most cases of congestion will clear up. Rarely, sinus congestion requires antibiotics but these are not usually helpful. You should start by addresses your concerns with your primary care doctor and coming up with a good treatment plan together.

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