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Can swelling of the eyes be related to migraine headaches?

I am a 39 yr old female and have had ongoing issues for 4-5 years. I intitially thought it was sinus as the symptoms are sinus pressure with or without headaches. I was given a scan of my sinuses and told they were ckear and given the diagnosis of atypical migraines. I have had my eyes checked and told they were fine but I continue to have problems with swelling and sensitivity to light and air. I recently did have what appearantly is called a visual aura where I had "swimming" vision for several minutes. I am curious as to whether the other issues I have been experiencing are related to migraine or if I should be otherwise concerned.
The symptoms you are describing do indeed sound very similar to the symptoms that people with migraines can complain of. Within the category of migraines, there are a lot of different types of migraines, and these may all present differently. The different types of migraines, and their presentations are beyond the scope of this discussion. In general though, sensitivity to light (also known as photophobia), and sound (phonophobia) are very common. The visual auras can present in many different ways, including the way that you described it. It is unlikely that the complaints of eye swelling are related but again, the presentation of migraines can vary depending on the type of migraine you are experiencing. It is best that you be evaluated by your neurologist as they will be able to best evaluate your medical history and presenting symptoms and decide upon the appropriate work up for this. They may decide to perform certain imaging studies or refer you to specialists. They will also be able to better decide upon the appropriate treatment options for you. These include medications, and certain injections that may alleviate some of the symptoms. They may also work your up for other neurological issues such as seizures as some of your complaints may also be related to atypical seizures.
This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.
If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or (in the United States) 911 immediately. Always seek the advice of your doctor before starting or changing treatment. Medical professionals who provide responses to health-related questions are intended third party beneficiaries with certain rights under Zocdoc’s Terms of Service.

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