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Why don't I get my period?

I am an 18 year-old female. I have had a problem with my period since I was 13. I got my period once the day after my 13th birthday and it lasted or 12 days. After that, I didnt get my period again until 4 1/2 years later. and it has been so irregular since. I got it June, then 5 weeks later, then exactly a month later, then a month and a half later and about a month after that. After October, it started getting weird, i didnt get it in November, then got it two days after Christmas, it was very light and only lasted two days, but I was in the worst pain I had ever been in. Since then I have not gotten it again, but have been having really bad cramps. I have been to my doctor and she didnt say that it was good or bad or tell me to do anything about it and I am not on any types of medications for it.
Early on when you are first getting your period, it can be normal for it to vary a lot in terms of when it comes. However, by the time you are 18, things should have settled into a normal rhythm. Therefore, you should definitely make an appointment to see your OB GYN doctor or your primary care doctor to discuss the situation. The mostly likely scenario is that you have a condition called polycystic ovarian syndrome. In this condition follicles in the ovary (the parts of the ovary that release the egg each month) begin to mature but, because of some hormone imbalances, they do not reliably release the egg (called ovulation). If ovulation does not happen, then the menstrual cycle will not happen or will happen only very irregularly. Polycystic ovarian syndrome is associated with trouble getting pregnant and it is also sometimes associated with being overweight and a risk to develop conditions like diabetes and high blood pressure later in life. In addition to good diet and exercise, there are medications that can be used to regularize your cycle. Some of these are medications that are normally used to treat diabetes, while sometimes birth control pills are also used. Your doctor can help you figure out the best approach in your case.
This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.
If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or (in the United States) 911 immediately. Always seek the advice of your doctor before starting or changing treatment. Medical professionals who provide responses to health-related questions are intended third party beneficiaries with certain rights under ZocDoc’s Terms of Service.
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