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Why do I get dizzy when I first start working out?

I am 30 years old, I am relatively healthy, I am fairly active, and never really had the issue before, I play a-lot of volleyball. I have a heart murmur, but this has never affected me in anyway before. Lately when i am at the gym lifting weights i get really dizzy and have to sit for a while before I can resume working out. It has been about 12 years since I have been to the doctor for anything. I don't take any medications. Could my murmur be getting worse?
There are several reasons for becoming dizzy while working out, and many of them are not serious. For example, sometimes people who work out do so while tired or improperly hydrated, which can lead to some of these symptoms. However, anytime a person complains of dizziness with exercise this does need to be checked out by a doctor. This is because sometimes this can be a sign of a heart condition, especially if you have a heart murmur. Other concerning symptoms would be chest pain or shortness of breath with exercise, episodes of palpitations or feeling your heart racing, or actually passing out. Additionally, if you have a family history of heart problems, especially of anyone who died suddenly without warning, this would be concerning. I suggest seeing your primary care doctor as soon as possible to evaluate your murmur and symptoms. In addition to a physical examination, your doctor may want to perform an electrocardiogram and maybe take some ultrasound pictures of your heart (echocardiogram). Depending on these results, they may refer you to see a cardiologist. While you are waiting to be seen, you should not engage in any vigorous exercise as this may provoke a serious problem if you do have a heart condition.
This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.
If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or (in the United States) 911 immediately. Always seek the advice of your doctor before starting or changing treatment. Medical professionals who provide responses to health-related questions are intended third party beneficiaries with certain rights under ZocDoc’s Terms of Service.

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