ZocdocAnswersWhat other than Topamax can I take that will help prevent migraine headaches?

Question

What other than Topamax can I take that will help prevent migraine headaches?

I am a 21 year-old male and a college student currently taking Topamax 25 mg bid and Zoloft 50 mg sid. have had extremely painful migraines on and off for years, up until I was prescribed Topamax as a prophylactic. The migraines have since subsided, but I have experienced a feeling of "stupification" and find it difficult to retain short-term memory from time to time. This is really starting to interfere with my schoolwork. Is there another preventative medication I can look into that will give me migraine-free days but still let me think clearly?

Answer

Migraines can be a chronic frustrating problem that interfere with your quality of life. However, if the medication that you are taking to prevent them is also interfering with your quality of life then it makes sense to try a different class of preventative medication.. Fortunately there are a lot of options, but unfortunately, they all come with their own set of side effects. It is important to work with your primary care doctor or neurologist to find a medication that will help prevent your migraines as well as have a side effect profile that is acceptable to you. The only way to know if you will experience unacceptable side effects from a medication is to try it. Hypertensive medications are often used to prevent migraines. Beta blockers (for example, propanolol) and calcium channel blockers (such as verapamil) are commonly used. Antidepressants are also used. You are currently taking zoloft so you might want to talk to your doctor about trying a different class of antidepressant which might be more helpful for preventing migraines such as amitriptyline. If you experience migraines with your menstrual cycle, birth control pills can also be helpful. There are also other anti-seizure medications besides topamax, such as neurontin, which can also be used as preventative medication.

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