ZocdocAnswersHow do I recover from brain damage caused by overdose?

Question

How do I recover from brain damage caused by overdose?

I'm 23 years old, and a couple years ago I was in a very bad situation and I ended up overdosing on Seroquel. I was in the hospital for three weeks and my memory and ability to concentrate were very bad. I've been reading up on things like neuroplasticity, and I was wondering how long it would take to make new neural pathways or to unblock neurons. I think I've been getting better but I'm still negatively affected.

Answer

I am sorry to hear that you have had such a difficult experience, and am glad that you seem to be doing better. Unfortunately, there is no perfect answer about how long it will take for you to see improvement in your memory, concentration, and other mental functions that you feel are being impaired. In general, the answer is that over a span of about 2 years nerves will have regrouped and repaired themselves inasmuch as they are able. The brain is somewhat different, as you have read, and there are sometimes amazing improvements that will continue to occur for some time. To best be able to answer this question, you should discuss your specific injury with the neurologists or neurosurgeons who have been helping you with your care since the injury happened. Depending on the location of your brain that has been affected, and any imaging studies that you might have had such as an MRI or CT scan, the answer could be very different for you than it would be for someone else. If you have stopped being seen by a neurologist, then your primary care physician would be able to direct you toward the appropriate specialist to answer your questions. You might also need repeat brain injury to better answer this question.

This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.

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