ZocdocAnswersHow should I prepare for an eye appointment for soft contacts (I currently wear hard)?

Question

How should I prepare for an eye appointment for soft contacts (I currently wear hard)?

I'm 29 years old and have worn rigid gas permeable hard contact lenses almost every day for the last 14 years. I'm interested in switching to soft contact lenses because I understand they are more comfortable. How long should I leave my hard contacts out before my eye exam appointment?

Answer

Contacts are a fairly commonly used device to help visual acuity. Starting contacts can be done with the help of an optometrist. If you have other concerns regarding your vision, you should see an ophthalmologist (a medical doctor who specializes in the eyes). In general, there is little to no preparation that is required before an eye appointment. To specifically answer you question, I would recommend that you do not wear your hard contact lenses on the day of your appointment, but instead wear glasses. I would recommend that you bring your hard contact and solution to the appointment, but wearing glasses instead is advisable. Your optometrist will likely have you try on soft contact and wearing glasses will facilitate this. In addition, you will likely need your visual acuity tested again to ensure you have the right soft contact prescription. Therefore, not wearing your hard contacts the night before and then the morning of the exam is probably long enough to allow for a good appointment. Soft contacts offer a lot of advantages over hard contacts, and therefore your decision to switch makes sense. Keep in mind that avid contact hygiene is required to avoid serious damage to your eyes. While commonplace, contacts of any type can risk eye infection or scarring. Talk to your optometrist.

This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.

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