ZocdocAnswersDoes being hit in the lower stomach affect a woman's ability to have kids/fertility?

Question

Does being hit in the lower stomach affect a woman's ability to have kids/fertility?

My boyfriend mistakenly hit me VERY hard in my lower stomach about a week ago. It was EXTREMELY painful and I still feel that something is off in my lower stomach. Could this have damaged my ability to have kids/my fertility?

Answer

Thank you for your question. I am sorry you are still having pain from this injury. It is very uncommon for women to have problems related to fertility from a blunt abdominal injury like the one you are describing. The fact that you are still feeling pain, however, is concerning, and you should seek an in-person evaluation from your doctor, preferably your OB/GYN, as it is not possible to make a diagnosis over the internet. She will be able to identify the source of the pain, and whether it is related to trauma to a particular organ, as well as whether further diagnostic testing is necessary or warranted. Particularly concerning symptoms would be severe pain, nausea / vomiting, blood in your stool, heavy vaginal bleeding. You should feel free to mention any symptoms you are having that are concerning to your doctor. Secondly, although you mention that the injury was an accident, domestic violence is one of the most common problems affecting women's health in this country. If you are experiencing domestic violence, if anyone is trying to hurt or hit you, or if you feel unsafe at home, you should mention this to your doctor right away. No one deserves to be abused, and they will have the experience to direct you to the appropriate resources to make sure you are not injured more seriously in the future.

This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.

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