ZocdocAnswersI feel pregnant and food tastes sour, but pregnancy tests are negative. What's going on?

Question

I feel pregnant and food tastes sour, but pregnancy tests are negative. What's going on?

I'm 3 months postpartum and have been using birth control consistently, so I really shouldn't be pregnant--but I've been feeling nauseous for the last few weeks and food tastes sour to me, just like it did in early pregnancy. Family and friends have been asking if I'm pregnant, but tests are negative. I am exclusively breastfeeding and have been taking zoloft since giving birth.

Answer

You should go to see your primary care doctor to help you figure out what is going on. It is very unlikely that you are pregnant, both because you are using birth control consistently and because the pregnancy tests that you have used to check are very accurate and unlikely to miss a pregnancy, especially if you have repeated a few. I think the most likely possibility is that you have gastro esophageal reflux disease, or acid reflux. The reason you feel now like you did early in your pregnancy is likely because gastro esophageal reflux disease is very common in pregnancy and could have been the source of your symptoms of sour taste and nausea back then as well. If you turn out to have acid reflux, sometimes this can be treated just with over the counter heart burn medications like Tums. Sometimes, however a prescription medication to suppress acid production is necessary, and your doctor can give this to you. You should also avoid foods which worsen acid reflux. These include alcoholic beverages, coffee and other beverages with caffeine, chocolate, and tomatoes. You should also avoid heavy, fatty meals. Start by talking with your primary care doctor to confirm the diagnosis.

This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.

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