ZocdocAnswersWill I find out how to reduce the number of nose bleeds my son has after a pediatric hematology follow up?

Question

Will I find out how to reduce the number of nose bleeds my son has after a pediatric hematology follow up?

He has them so often it happens twice or three times a day.

Answer

The answer to your question depends on what workup has already been done for your son's nose bleeds and what is already known. When a child presents to his or her pediatrician with the complaint of very frequent nose bleeds, the common causes must be ruled out. The common causes of nose bleeds in kids includes mechanical trauma (often from picking), or irritation from an upper respiratory track infection. Other more rare causes of frequent nose bleeds include a genetic disease called hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. If nose bleeds run in the family, then this is a possibility. If your son also gets bruised easily, then he may have a blood clotting problem that makes his nose bleed at the smallest amount of trauma. If this is the case, then a hematologist will be very helpful. I suggest that you schedule an appointment with the hematologist. This doctor will want to know details about your son's nose bleeds and will likely want details on your family's medical history. Your son will need to have his blood drawn because the hematologist will want to make sure that he does not have a blood clotting problem. If nothing is found, or if the hematologist cannot fine the cause of the nose bleeds, you need to schedule an appointment with an ear nose and throat doctor. An ENT doc will be able to examine his nose more closely and find the source, and possibly the cause of the bleeding.

This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.

If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or (in the United States) 911 immediately. Always seek the advice of your doctor before starting or changing treatment. Medical professionals who provide responses to health-related questions are intended third party beneficiaries with certain rights under Zocdoc’s Terms of Service.