ZocdocAnswersWhy do I feel crampy two weeks before my period?

Question

Why do I feel crampy two weeks before my period?

Im 28 and the mother of one 3 year old girl. For the first time I am experiencing period like uterine cramping about 10 days before my period is due to begin. I am on ortho tri cyclen lo and have recently been diagnosed hpv positive but upon further investigation about a month ago by colposcopy was told my cervix looks perfect. My mother and older sister have endometriosis I wonder if that could be the cause of my cramps? Am I in the beginning stages of endometriosis possibly? The cramps are bad just annoying because it makes me think something is wrong.

Answer

I suggest that you make an appointment to talk with your OB GYN doctor about these symptoms. Generally speaking uterine cramping symptoms as a general menstrual phenomenon get a lot better while on a birth control pill. Therefore, cramping while on the birth control pill could suggest some other problem. I agree with you that the fact that you have been recently diagnosed with HPV, in the absence of any findings on colposcopy, is unlikely to be related to these symptoms. One possibility would be a pelvic infection, such as from gonorrhea or chlamydia, which are common and frequently cause cramping pain. With a good physical examination and some basic laboratory tests,your doctor can rule this out. Endometriosis is definitely another possibility. Again, sometimes endometriosis pain gets better with a birth control pill, but this effect is inconsistent and it is definitely possible to have endometriosis pain that begins or worsens while on a birth control pill. Similarly, other problems with the uterus, such as uterine fibroids, could cause pain and cramping that might be intermittent but also might worsen over time if the fibroids enlarge. In short, start by talking to your OB GYN doctor who will help you to determine if this needs further investigation.

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