ZocdocAnswersWill eating more protein really make my muscles get bigger faster?

Question

Will eating more protein really make my muscles get bigger faster?

I started a work out routine and have increased the protein in my diet to bulk up. Does consuming protein really help your muscles get bigger? Could you consume too much protein?

Answer

When we work out our muscles, the body reacts by increasing the size of each muscle cell. The reason for this reaction is that the body thinks that if it needs to use those muscles, that it should make them bigger and able to perform heavier and more difficult tasks. Muscles contain long protein structures that are responsible for the their contractile function. Thus, when muscles get bigger, they need protein in the blood to use as building blocks to produce these protein structures. Consuming a higher protein diet allows for more protein to be available for muscle building. However, consuming more protein than your muscles need will not make them bigger. Therefore, you should consume enough protein to allow your muscles to grow. It is difficult to say how much protein you need to consume on a daily basis to keep your muscles happy. Most physicians would agree that consuming a diet with a moderate amount of protein (without supplementation) is enough for the average person who works out. While it is possible to consume too much protein, most people do not reach this point, even if they drink a protein shake to supplement their diet. If you have kidney or liver disease, there may be some harm caused by consuming too much protein. I suggest that you schedule an appointment with your primary care physician to discuss this issue. Your doctor can provide you with advice on how much protein is necessary and safe for your diet and work out plan.

This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.

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